concluding paragraph as i am a economic naturalist (400-500 words), economics homework help

  

Background InformationToday there are many complaints over the politicization of science. Many people believe politics should not play a role in science, but once government funds science, the funding decisions become political. In most social institutions, disagreements are settled by debate. Science in contrast, uses experiments to prove or disprove theories. Science is testable, and is self-proving. If a better explanation for a phenomenon is found, it will replace other explanations. This is why careful distinctions must be made between Frontier Science, Consensus Science, and Junk Science.Many difficult controversies surround the environmental problems we face in the world today. Problems include: Air and water pollution, global warming, species and ecosystem biodiversity, energy, hazardous waste, population, and food supply issues. Politics control the financing of scientific research and development to help solve these issues. In politics passion wins over logic.Science is not politics and cannot be debated in the same way politics are. Mixing politics with science produces bad science. Government efforts to fund research interfere with the maintenance of high scientific standards. The current Congress consists of 535 members. Of these members, 7 (1.3%), are scientists, and 21 others are healthcare professionals.ReferencesReferencesUse these references along with resources from your own research to help answer the questions that follow.Lamb, G. (2005, September 27). Science and politics: a dangerous hly paid and highly skilled
workers that use more machines to accomplish the same work. Now, this is not true for all
industries because highly skilled workers are not much more effective as house cleaners, and a
modern automotive factory has no place for unskilled workers— but this is the choice faced in
Shamas 6
many industries. When minimum wage rises, it becomes more difficult and costly to hire
unskilled workers. The decision is then made to employ highly paid and highly skilled workers,
because they are more attractive to businesses and businesses want to hire more skilled workers.
With these skilled workers in greater demand, their job opportunities and earnings increase.
Unionized workers aim to be more highly paid and highly skilled than the populace as a whole
and, so, they prosper from this effect.
Shamas 7
American Labor Union leaders may very well believe that raising the minimum wage is a
great policy for America, but they also know that it is a great policy for their members too.
Union members earning above $7.25 an hour gain benefit directly from raising the minimum
wage because it reduces the struggle they face from the unskilled workers. This is not just a
hypothetical argument. Researchers have found that this is what happens when the minimum
wage increases. Using data from government surveys, economists at the Federal Reserve and the
University of California–Irvine examined how past increases in the minimum wage troubled the
earnings of both low-income and unionized workers. They found that increasing the minimum
wage had few mathematically significant effects for unionized workers who earn higher than the
minimum wage. For example, United Auto Workers members in Detroit who earn $75 an hour
do not usually perform work that could be done by any number of the less skilled workers. But
the minimum wage significantly raises the earnings of union members who battle with lowskilled workers for jobs. The researchers predicted that if the minimum wage were raised by 40
percent, unionized workers who earn between the minimum wage and twice the minimum wage
could see their earnings rising by 20 and 40 percent. The evidence shows that a higher minimum
wage unconditionally helps union members.
Unions campaign to raise the minimum wage at least in part because it improves them.
Raising the minimum wage makes less skilled workers more costly for businesses to hire, and so
hiring skilled and highly paid union members becomes a more attractive option. This effect
boosts union members’ earned income but reduces low-income workers’ job possibility and
income. The unions that support raising the minimum wage is reasonable, but antipoverty
promoters should reconsider their support for a policy that affects the very people they seek to
help.
Shamas 8
Mini Paper #3
The Movie theaters are shooting fish in a barrel by charging intuitively high prices to
their captive audience. A monopolist has a sweet spot between price, demand, and cost that lets it
boost profits. There is nothing in economics that requires that sweet spot to be acceptable for
most people, and in fact, it is pretty much always higher than a situation where there is
competition. The theater operators can attempt to sell popcorn to a student for $1 and for $3 to
adults. This is called 3rd degree price discrimination, which states that sellers in the market can
charge different prices to consumers in completely different markets which help to increase
profits. “They are in a monopoly selling position, “says Russell Winer, chair of the marketing
department at NYU’s Stern School of Business. “Since they don’t allow us, to bring in our own
food into the theaters, they will pretty much charge us what the market can bear.” In reality, the
movie theater will charge a price for the popcorn where the spread between what it costs them to
make another box of popcorn, and what consumers in the market will pay for that box of popcorn
is at its highest level. Students and adults will buy and continue to buy popcorn because it’s a
part of the experience of seeing a movie One of the most known reasons that, movie theater
concessions are so expensive is because that is how the movie theater makes a profit. Movie
theaters don’t make that much money from movies, the movie studios actually do. Now, this
brings upon the case of arbitrage, which states that, the purchase of something for costless riskfree sale at a higher price. Some adventurous students would take hold of the opportunity of
arbitrage, with selling popcorn to irritated adults for only $2. Under the pressure of competition
from other arbitrageurs, the price difference would fall until the price difference was barely
sufficient to make it worth the students’ while to engage in the transaction. Movie theaters have
Shamas 9
different markets of consumers coming in at all times, they are able to price discriminate on
popcorn and other concession stand items.
First, movie theaters use popcorn to price discriminate across moviegoers because they
will buy it regardless of how much it costs, it’s also a part of the experience of seeing a movie.
Popcorn is one of the main items that let theaters charge different consumers different prices for
going to the movies, and it helps boost profits. Now, different moviegoers have a different desire
to pay for the experience of watching a movie. When moviegoers go on a date to the movies,
they are inclined to spend a lot of money. In price discrimination, the most commonly used is
third degree price discrimination .The type of price discrimination used at movie theaters to sell
popcorn is 3rd degree price discrimination, which means that sellers in the market can charge
different prices to consumers in different markets. The groundwork of this application is to
divide the market according to the price elasticity into subordinate groups and to sell goods to
different groups with different prices. In 3rd price discrimination, firms divide the consumers into
groups based on number of the household, trade, industrial, company users, social statue,
personal taste, the area of use of the product and other factors and apply different prices to these
groups. An example of how third degree price discrimination, takes place in the different
consumer markets, is that a theater operator can attempt to sell popcorn to students for $1 and to
adults for $3. In price discrimination which will be applied by the firm which has an ability to
regulate the price and with, the subdivided markets’ price elasticity and the price of the selling
product in that market, a negative correlation is expected. In the high elasticity sub-market the
product is sold for a lower price; and in the less elasticity sub- market the product is sold
relatively high price. This is brought upon by the idea of Market efficiency, entails that the
Shamas 10
market price does not have to be equal to the true value. As an outcome, price discrimination can
increase market efficiency.
Second, in the movie industry, students and adults utilize “true arbitrage”, because it can
be used to improve the odds of a successful transaction. Arbitrage, in its natural form, is
characterized as the purchase of securities on one market for immediate resale on another market
in order to benefit from a price variation. This develops in immediate risk-free gain. An example
is if a security’s price on the NYSE is trading out of accord with its corresponding futures
contract on Chicago’s exchange, a trader could concurrently sell short the more valuable of the
two and buy the other, thus benefitting on the difference. This type of arbitrage requires the
breach of at least one of these three conditions: 1.The same security must trade at the same cost
on all markets. 2. Two securities with equal cash flows must trade at the same cost. 3. A security
with a known cost in the future via a future contract must trade today at that cost discounted by
the risk-free rate. Arbitrage, however, can take on other patterns. Risk arbitrage is the second
form of arbitrage. Unlike natural arbitrage, risk arbitrage requires risk. Through considered
“speculation,” risk arbitrage has become one of the most well- known forms of arbitrage.
Now, an example is, let’s say Company A is presently trading at $10/share. Company B,
which wants to buy Company A, decides to place a takeover proposal on Company A for
$15/share. This means that all of Company A’s shares today are worth $15/share, but are selling
at only $10/share. Let’s say the early transactions bid it up to $14/share. Now, there is still a
$1/share difference–a moment for risk arbitrage. So, where’s the risk? Well, the investment
could fall through, in which case the shares would be worth only the initial $10/share. Arbitrage
stays in play until the price difference was scarcely enough to make it worth the students’ and
adults while to enlist in the transaction.
Shamas 11
All in all, Not only does the selling of expensive concessions acknowledge theaters to
locate which consumers can pay more for a movie experience, it also allows theaters to zero in
on those consumers and figure out who is willing to pay extra for certain types and mixtures of
snacks. They do this through what’s called “mixed bundling” in economic jargon. Bundling is
where you combine one product with another – like the popcorn-soda combo. Mixed bundling is
where you offer combos like that, but also let people buy products – popcorn and soda –
individually. An example is that the theater charges the highest price it perhaps can for soda and
popcorn individually. But it offers a slight deduction on the combo. Lastly, just remember, that
this is basically how movie theaters make their money.
Work Cited
Woodruff, Mandi. “Here’s Why Airline Food Tastes So Bad.” Business Insider. Business Insider,
Inc, 20 Sept. 2013. Web. 19 Feb. 2016.
Beck, Julie. “Why Airplane Food Is So Bad.” The Atlantic. Atlantic …
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concluding paragraph as i am a economic naturalist (400-500 words), economics homework help

  

“It is a crime to be ignorant of Economics” is what I feel. Economics is not an art, neither science, not a subject rather not also a discipline. It is simply the lifeblood of this entire empire of the World, the Banyan tree which has its roots worldwide; the roots of money.Why at all do people need a quote for it it!  It is an essential ingredient to the recipe of wealth, the recipe of luxury that of satisfaction and ultimately of solace. Economics is there in everything. Be it in the wind, the water, the trees the soil or a country. Mother Nature has instinctively inculcated this and thus being an economic naturalist is what gives me solace.From the home maker of a household to the governor of the central bank; all have the constraints of resources and desire to maximize utility. My paper, thus, is on the lifeblood itself…On the person who find economics in everything…In every real life problem…It is on economic naturalism.  As per J.K. Galbreith,“Economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists” And I as an economic naturalist seek to answer some real life breath tight question like the face –quirking quality of flight food, the constant bandwagon demand of labour Union for the minimum wage rate and the street smart strategies of theatre owners to give discount to the students.As per B.R. Ambedkar “History shows that where ethics and economics come in conflict victory is always with the economics. Vested interests have never been known to have willingly divested themselves unless there was a sufficient force to compel them”And this economic stark reality answers all real life questions quite brutally; but in blunt terms of Economics.Economics is the play of the have and the have-nots, the worthy and the worth-nots, the want and the want-nots and finally the why and the why-nots.My paper, though just a bud in the garden of economic flowers strides for an aroma of realism.
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Shamas 1
In the initial days of commercial flights, when an airplane would take individuals on a 20
hour trip to a foreign country, there wasn’t really much anything to do except read, eat and nap.
There was no in flight movies to watch or stare at and try to lip read because individuals like us
refused to purchase headphones. Individuals on these transatlantic planes could admire the view
of the clouds too. In the years to come, and to keep the passengers entertained, the airline
industry copied other modes of transit such as trains, boats and turned their attention to food. It
was extraordinary, in the post-world war II era to be served a multi-course meal on a flight, a
very fancy one too. Airlines served carved roast beef, lobster, and prime rib and also real
glassware, and not those plastic cups filled with ice cubes that have the peculiar holes that we get
now. Many airlines plunging all over each other trying to offer a fine dining experience to their
passengers. “The other side of entertainment was to drink, of course,” says Guillaume de Syon, a
professor of history at Albright College who has researched the airline history of food. These
aircrafts were not always very reliable. Now, if passengers knew that they would have to land in
Reykjavik to have the engine checked. They’d be happy because they could stock up on booze. It
was not unusual to have passengers disembark from transatlantic flights drunk. As the airline
industry began to grow, flying became cheaper and easier, and these airlines found themselves
with more mouths to feed, making the level of special dining unsuitable. “It gets more
expensive,” de Syon says, flight technology gets better, it gets faster, and you can carry more
passengers. Airlines now no longer have the same economies of scale, like if you’re trying to
feed 60 passengers that’s one thing but the second you’re trying to feed four flights of 150
passengers, airlines have a huge operational problem.” In the year 1952, the economy class was
born, and it came with a downturn in the quality of food served in flight.
Shamas 2
First, today’s planes which reach altitudes of 35,000 feet or even more, are pressurized,
so individuals only feel like they are 6,000 to 8,000 feet above sea level. At an altitude of 35,000
feet in the air, with the combination of air pressure and low humidity inside airplane cabins does
a real number on airplane passengers’ taste buds. In a 2010, when German airline Lufthansa
performed an in-flight conditions study, they found passenger’s ability to taste salty and sweet
flavors from was diminished as much as 30 percent. Now, once your tongue starts fading, so
does an individual’s sense of smell, which makes up as much as 80 percent of taste. This also
helps the individual keep breathing at these high altitudes, but it also numbs their taste bids,
making the food taste bland.
Second, another aspect of the airplane environment that make the quality of food less
optimal is cabin humidity which typically below 20 percent. The low percentage of cabin
humidity can dry out an individual’s nose, which weakens the individual’s sense of smell. Smell
is simultaneously linked to taste. Also, the air in the cabin is recycled about every two to three
minutes, plus the air conditioning, can dry up and cool down food very quickly. If an airline was
to serve a nice piece of chicken breast, which can be done on board, within one or two minutes,
the chicken would be like sawdust. The solution to this problem is the sauce. The sauce preserves
the meat from saw dusting out when reheated and served in a bone- dry airplane cabin.
Third, another aspect that also plays a role in the quality of food on flights is time, as noted by
the economist Tyler Cowen in his book “An Economist Gets Lunch.” “Before deregulation in the
1970s, airline food was often excellent,” Cowen writes. “Prices were so high that flying was, for
the most part, the province of the wealthy people rather than a common American experience, as
it is today.” As flying became more economical, however, the food quality started to drop as
well. As airlines basically reheat food that’s already been cooked on the ground, it’s very difficult
Shamas 3
to pack enough flavors into entrees to keep mouths watering and noses un-crinkled when flight
attendants pass out meals. The good news is that mostly all of the great food is available for
travelers is in the airport, not in the airplane cabins where choice is limited and prices sometimes
quadruple.
“One of the airline industries missions is to increase the tastiness of the food,” Platkin
says. “But there are so many things popping up that are focus on healthy foods, and the airlines
generally are not doing that.” He also notes that making the food taste superior could reflect
negatively on the airlines in other ways. Scientists have found that food directly jolts the mood of
passengers on an airplane. When passengers are in the air traveling, they eat a lot of fat and
sugar, which affects them in a negative way. Even though food is an important part to living and
also an essential part of the experience, since passengers first packed themselves into these metal
tubes we call airplanes, to get from one place to another, but now it’s becoming less and less on
flights.
As free meal service disappears from more flights, on anything shorter than an
international flight overseas, you’re likely to have to do with peanuts or a sandwich bought for
an extra cost off a cart. De Syon says airlines are altering from food-as-entertainment to,
entertainment-as-entertainment. Thus, the personalized movie screens on the back of the seat in
front of you. While installing these technologies might be a large initial investment, once they’re
there, passengers are satisfied with no further effort required. Considering the cost and logistical
issues involved in serving food on airplanes—food the passengers might not even like much of
the time—de Syon says it makes sense.
Passengers are more pleased spending two hours watching a movie than getting bored of
the food, or getting too drunk. A big problem airlines encounter is that the drunkenness often
Shamas 4
leads to air rage. It’s better to have passengers focus on a screen or enjoy themselves on the
Internet. Give your waistline and your wallet some benefit in traveling and go shopping for
snacks before getting on a flight.
Mini Paper #2
The supporters of boosting the minimum wage argue over whether it will raise the salary
of low- income workers. American Labor unions are among the most conspicuous of these
supporters, a reason that makes little instinctive sense as a result of very few union workers work
for minimum wage. The Unions, however, are not just being charitable when they push to raise
the minimum wage. With increasing the minimum wage, the expense of hiring unskilled workers
increases. Thus, this makes hiring skilled workers union members, additionally more appealing,
and could raise the salary of union members who battle with minimum wage workers by 20-40
percent. In the meantime, non-union, unskilled workers’ salaries literally fall due to less working
hours and less job opportunities. These American Labor unions’ also have contracts that
frequently require employees to pay union dues or lose their jobs. This effort forces workers to
support the union financially even if the union contract misuses them or they disagree with the
union’s agenda. A few states, including New Hampshire and Indiana, are considering the rightto-work laws, are statutes in several of the states in the United States that prevent union security
agreements, or agreements between labor unions and employers, that govern the range to which
an established union can require employees’ membership, payment of union dues, or expense as
a condition of employment, either before or after hiring. Unions defy these laws because they
reduce union membership and wages. However, the rest of the economy profits from right-towork laws. The Right-to-work laws lessen the financial benefit from organizing workplaces
where unions have limited support. This makes unions less hostile and reassures business
Shamas 5
investment, creating jobs. States can and should lessen unemployment by becoming right-towork states for everyone. Therefore, labor unions should keep supporting the minimum wage
laws very firmly as they are currently doing.
The labor unions support boosting the minimum wage very powerfully because life
becomes as costly as you get older. Many social groups are devoted to fighting poverty, such as
the U.S. conference of Catholic Bishops who are the episcopal conference of the Catholic
Church in the United States, who are very supportive in raising the minimum wage. Now, this
makes perfect sense because many individuals support raising the minimum wage below the
well-intentioned but are mistaken into believing that it would reduce poverty. Some of the
strongest supporters for a higher minimum wage, however, are the American labor unions,
whose stake in the issue is a clear cut. In November 2006, organized labor led riots to raise the
minimum wage in six states and grant democrats control of congress, in part on the platform of
raising the minimum wage across the United States of America. Still, very few union members
work for the minimum wage. Only 2.1 percent of minimum-wage workers belong to a union,
versus 12.0 percent of the overall working population. Nonetheless, American labor unions fight
passionately for a higher minimum wage for all workers.
The skilled workers benefit the most from the American labor unions because many
companies face a choice between two ways of making their product. The first and foremost
alternative is to hire many low-wage and unskilled workers to do the job, but that again wouldn’t
get the job done correctly. The other choice is to hire a few highly paid and highly skilled
workers that use more machines to accomplish the same work. Now, this is not true for all
industries because highly skilled workers are not much more effective as house cleaners, and a
modern automotive factory has no place for unskilled workers— but this is the choice faced in
Shamas 6
many industries. When minimum wage rises, it becomes more difficult and costly to hire
unskilled workers. The decision is then made to employ highly paid and highly skilled workers,
because they are more attractive to businesses and businesses want to hire more skilled workers.
With these skilled workers in greater demand, their job opportunities and earnings increase.
Unionized workers aim to be more highly paid and highly skilled than the populace as a whole
and, so, they prosper from this effect.
Shamas 7
American Labor Union leaders may very well believe that raising the minimum wage is a
great policy for America, but they also know that it is a great policy for their members too.
Union members earning above $7.25 an hour gain benefit directly from raising the minimum
wage because it reduces the struggle they face from the unskilled workers. This is not just a
hypothetical argument. Researchers have found that this is what happens when the minimum
wage increases. Using data from government surveys, economists at the Federal Reserve and the
University of California–Irvine examined how past increases in the minimum wage troubled the
earnings of both low-income and unionized workers. They found that increasing the minimum
wage had few mathematically significant effects for unionized workers who earn higher than the
minimum wage. For example, United Auto Workers members in Detroit who earn $75 an hour
do not usually perform work that could be done by any number of the less skilled workers. But
the minimum wage significantly raises the earnings of union members who battle with lowskilled workers for jobs. The researchers predicted that if the minimum wage were raised by 40
percent, unionized workers who earn between the minimum wage and twice the minimum wage
could see their earnings rising by 20 and 40 percent. The evidence shows that a higher minimum
wage unconditionally helps union members.
Unions campaign to raise the minimum wage at least in part because it improves them.
Raising the minimum wage makes less skilled workers more costly for businesses to hire, and so
hiring skilled and highly paid union members becomes a more attractive option. This effect
boosts union members’ earned income but reduces low-income workers’ job possibility and
income. The unions that support raising the minimum wage is reasonable, but antipoverty
promoters should reconsider their support for a policy that affects the very people they seek to
help.
Shamas 8
Mini Paper #3
The Movie theaters are shooting fish in a barrel by charging intuitively high prices to
their captive audience. A monopolist has a sweet spot between price, demand, and cost that lets it
boost profits. There is nothing in economics that requires that sweet spot to be acceptable for
most people, and in fact, it is pretty much always higher than a situation where there is
competition. The theater operators can attempt to sell popcorn to a student for $1 and for $3 to
adults. This is called 3rd degree price discrimination, which states that sellers in the market can
charge different prices to consumers in completely different markets which help to increase
profits. “They are in a monopoly selling position, “says Russell Winer, chair of the marketing
department at NYU’s Stern School of Business. “Since they don’t allow us, to bring in our own
food into the theaters, they will pretty much charge us what the market can bear.” In reality, the
movie theater will charge a price for the popcorn where the spread between what it costs them to
make another box of popcorn, and what consumers in the market will pay for that box of popcorn
is at its highest level. Students and adults will buy and continue to buy popcorn because it’s a
part of the experience of seeing a movie One of the most known reasons that, movie theater
concessions are so expensive is because that is how the movie theater makes a profit. Movie
theaters don’t make that much money from movies, the movie studios actually do. Now, this
brings upon the case of arbitrage, which states that, the purchase of something for costless riskfree sale at a higher price. Some adventurous students would take hold of the opportunity of
arbitrage, with selling popcorn to irritated adults for only $2. Under the pressure of competition
from other arbitrageurs, the price difference would fall until the price difference was barely
sufficient to make it worth the students’ while to engage in the transaction. Movie theaters have
Shamas 9
different markets of consumers coming in at all times, they are able to price discriminate on
popcorn and other concession stand items.
First, movie theaters use popcorn to price discriminate across moviegoers because they
will buy it regardless of how much it costs, it’s also a part of the experience of seeing a movie.
Popcorn is one of the main items that let theaters charge different consumers different prices for
going to the movies, and it helps boost profits. Now, different moviegoers have a different desire
to pay for the experience of watching a movie. When moviegoers go on a date to the movies,
they are inclined to spend a lot of money. In price discrimination, the most commonly used is
third degree price discrimination .The type of price discrimination used at movie theaters to sell
popcorn is 3rd degree price discrimination, which means that sellers in the market can charge
different prices to consumers in different markets. The groundwork of this application is to
divide the market according to the price elasticity into subordinate groups and to sell goods to
different groups with different prices. In 3rd price discrimination, firms divide the consumers into
groups based on number of the household, trade, industrial, company users, social statue,
personal taste, the area of use of the product and other factors and apply different prices to these
groups. An example of how third degree price discrimination, takes place in the different
consumer markets, is that a theater operator can attempt to sell popcorn to students for $1 and to
adults for $3. In price discrimination which will be applied by the firm which has an ability to
regulate the price and with, the subdivided markets’ price elasticity and the price of the selling
product in that market, a negative correlation is expected. In the high elasticity sub-market the
product is sold for a lower price; and in the less elasticity sub- market the product is sold
relatively high price. This is brought upon by the idea of Market efficiency, entails that the
Shamas 10
market price does not have to be equal to the true value. As an outcome, price discrimination can
increase market efficiency.
Second, in the movie industry, students and adults utilize “true arbitrage”, because it can
be used to improve the odds of a successful transaction. Arbitrage, in its natural form, is
characterized as the purchase of securities on one market for immediate resale on another market
in order to benefit from a price variation. This develops in immediate risk-free gain. An example
is if a security’s price on the NYSE is trading out of accord with its corresponding futures
contract on Chicago’s exchange, a trader could concurrently sell short the more valuable of the
two and buy the other, thus benefitting on the difference. This type of arbitrage requires the
breach of at least one of these three conditions: 1.The same security must trade at the same cost
on all markets. 2. Two securities with equal cash flows must trade at the same cost. 3. A security
with a known cost in the future via a future contract must trade today at that cost discounted by
the risk-free rate. Arbitrage, however, can take on other patterns. Risk arbitrage is the second
form of arbitrage. Unlike natural arbitrage, risk arbitrage requires risk. Through considered
“speculation,” risk arbitrage has become one of the most well- known forms of arbitrage.
Now, an example is, let’s say Company A is presently trading at $10/share. Company B,
which wants to buy Company A, decides to place a takeover proposal on Company A for
$15/share. This means that all of Company A’s shares today are worth $15/share, but are selling
at only $10/share. Let’s say the early transactions bid it up to $14/share. Now, there is still a
$1/share difference–a moment for risk arbitrage. So, where’s the risk? Well, the investment
could fall through, in which case the shares would be worth only the initial $10/share. Arbitrage
stays in play until the price difference was scarcely enough to make it worth the students’ and
adults while to enlist in the transaction.
Shamas 11
All in all, Not only does the selling of expensive concessions acknowledge theaters to
locate which consumers can pay more for a movie experience, it also allows theaters to zero in
on those consumers and figure out who is willing to pay extra for certain types and mixtures of
snacks. They do this through what’s called “mixed bundling” in economic jargon. Bundling is
where you combine one product with another – like the popcorn-soda combo. Mixed bundling is
where you offer combos like that, but also let people buy products – popcorn and soda –
individually. An example is that the theater charges the highest price it perhaps can for soda and
popcorn individually. But it offers a slight deduction on the combo. Lastly, just remember, that
this is basically how movie theaters make their money.
Work Cited
Woodruff, Mandi. “Here’s Why Airline Food Tastes So Bad.” Business Insider. Business Insider,
Inc, 20 Sept. 2013. Web. 19 Feb. 2016.
Beck, Julie. “Why Airplane Food Is So Bad.” The Atlantic. Atlantic …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

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