Dissertation

  

applying the  Ten Strategic Points, the Prospectus, the Proposal, and the Dissertation. What is the purpose of each of these documents? How do you anticipate interacting with these documents? Explain.My research topic is The effects of family structure on criminal behavior and activity by juvenile males and femalesI have uploaded information on ten strategic points
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The 10 Key Strategic Points for the Prospectus, Proposal,
and Dissertation
Introduction
In the prospectus, proposal and dissertation there are ten key strategic points that need to be
clear, simple, correct, and aligned to ensure the research is doable, valuable, and credible.
The 10 key strategic points emerge from researching literature on a topic which is based on or
aligned with the learner’s personal passion, future career purpose, and degree area. These points
provide a guiding vision for the research.
The Ten Strategic Points
A document outlining the 10 key strategic points includes the following that define the research
focus and approach:
1. Topic – Provides a board research topic area/title.
2. Purpose Statement – Provides one sentence statement of purpose including Problem
Statement – Describes the phenomena to study (qualitative) or variables/groups
(quantitative) to study, in one sentence.
3. the problem statement, sample, methodology, and design.
4. Research Questions – Provides research questions to collect data to address the problem
statement.
5. Hypothesis/Variables or Phenomena – Provides hypotheses with variables for each
research question (quantitative) or describes the phenomena to be better understood
(qualitative).
6. Literature Review – Lists primary points for four sections in the Literature Review: (a)
Background of the problem/gap; (b) Theoretical foundations (models and theories to be
foundation for study); (c) Review of literature topics with key theme for each one; (d)
Summary.
7. Methodology and Design – Describes the selected methodology and specific research
design to address problem statement and research questions.
8. Sample and Location – Identifies sample, needed sample size, and location (study
phenomena with small numbers and variables/groups with large numbers).
9. Data Collection – Describes primary instruments and sources of data to answer research
questions.
10. Data Analysis – Describes the specific data analysis approaches to be used to address
research questions.
The Process for Defining the Ten Strategic Points
The order of the ten strategic points listed above reflects the order in which the work is done by
the learner. The first five strategic points focus primarily on defining the focus for the research
based on the learner’s passion and purpose as well as the review of the literature. First a learner
identifies a broad topic area to research for their dissertation that they are interested in because it
is based on their personal passion, future career purpose, and degree being pursued. Second, the
learner than completes a preliminary, and then ongoing, review of the literature to define the gap
or problem they will address, the theories and models that will provide a foundation for their
research, related topics that are needed to demonstrate their expertise in their field, and define the
key strategic points behind their proposed research. Third, the learner develops a clear, simple,
one sentence problem statement that defines the problem, or gap, that will be addressed by the
research. Fourth, the learner identifies some potential samples they would have access to in order
to collect the data for the study, considering the fact the quantitative study sample sizes need to
be much larger than those for qualitative studies. Fifth, the learner develops a set of research
questions that will collect the data needed to address the problem statement.
Based on the above five strategic points the learner now defines the key aspects of the
research methodology through the last five strategic points. Sixth, the learner either describes the
phenomena to be studied (if it is a qualitative study), or develops a set of matching hypotheses
that defines the variables that will be the focus for the research (if it is a quantitative study).
Seventh, the learner determines if the study will be qualitative, quantitative or mixed research
based on (a) the best approach for the research, (b) the size of the sample they can get permission
to access, (c) availability of data collection tools and sources, and (d) time and resources to
conduct the study. And they select the best design approach considering these same factors.
Eight, the learner develops a purpose statement by integrating the problem statement, sample,
methodology, and design. Ninth, the learner identifies the data they will need to address the
research questions or hypotheses and how they will collect the data (e.g., interviews, focus
groups, observations, tested and validated instruments or surveys, data bases, etc.) Tenth, they
identify the appropriate data analysis to be used to answer their research questions and address
their problem statement.
Criteria for Evaluating the Ten Strategic Points: Clear, Simple, Correct and Aligned
When developing research, it is important to define the ten strategic points so they are simple,
clear and correct in order to ensure anyone who reviews them will easily understand them. It is
important to align all of the ten strategic points to ensure it will be possible to conduct and
complete the research. Developing the 10 Strategic Points as a two to three-page document can
help ensure clarity, simplicity, correctness, and alignment of each of these ten key strategic
points in the prospectus, proposal, and dissertation. Developing these ten strategic points on a
two to three pages provides an easy-to-use use template to ensure the ten strategic points are
always worded the same throughout the prospectus, proposal, and dissertation. A rubric has
been developed and is included in the appropriate classrooms to assist you in evaluating your
work in the creation of the ten strategic points.
Value of the 10 Strategic Points Document
This 10 Strategic Points document can be used for communicating and aligning key
stakeholders for the dissertation. This document can be used to get agreement between the
learner and the chair on the initial focus and approach for your research. The document can be
used to review the proposed research with the people or organizations where the learner needs to
get permission to conduct their research which is needed before the learner develops their
Proposal. The document is useful for communicating the dissertation focus when attracting a
Content Expert as well as for reviewing the proposal with the dissertation committee and the
AQR reviewers. Further, submitting this document with the prospectus to the Methodologist will
assist in demonstrating to the methodologist the methodology, design, data collection, and data
analysis align with the problem statement, research questions, and hypotheses or phenomena.
Examples of the 10 Strategic Points Document
It is important that the ten strategic points are clear, concise, doable, and align throughout
the prospectus, proposal, and dissertation. Following are samples for a quantitative study and a
qualitative study. A mixed method study requires the completion of a sheet for both a
quantitative and qualitative method and therefore takes more time and resources to complete.
Additionally the learner must be able to do both qualitative and quantitative data analysis. A
qualitative study with numbers or descriptive statistics does not mean it is mixed method study.
Qualitative data can be displayed using tables, charts, graphs and descriptive statistics.
Example 1: Ten Strategic Points for a Quantitative Correlational Study:
1. Topic – Provides a board research topic area/title: Relationship of Servant Leadership
behaviors in principals, school culture, and student performance
2. Literature review – Lists primary points for four sections in the Literature Review: a.
Background of the problem/gap; b. Theoretical foundations (models and theories to
be foundation for study); c. Review of literature topics with key theme for each one; d.
Summary.
a. Background of the problem/gap;
i.
The national call for school accountability is a critical issue that has
gained attention from federal educational lawmakers given the rate at
which American students are falling behind other countries influenced
federal lawmakers in the creation of the NCL Act (Koretz, 2009).
ii.
The school principal of the twenty first century has been asked to do and
be competent in more and more tasks than the previous two centuries of
school principals including improving student performance and the school
culture (Kafka, 2009).
iii.
The characteristics of school culture are complex, and a leader must
understand these complex variables before they create change with the
school (MacNeil et al., 2009).
iv.
Black (2010) conducted a mixed method correlated study showing
relationship of servant leadership and school climate.
v.
Pritchard et al. (2005) explored the relationships between district and
school culture and student achievement.
b. Theoretical foundations (models and theories to be foundation for study);
i.
Servant leadership model (Greenleaf, 1977; Patterson 2003)
ii.
School culture models (MacNeil, 2009; Schein, 1985)
iii.
Broad set of studies exploring relationship among these two models and
performance in school. (Halawah, 2005; MacNeil et al.,2009)
c. Review of literature topics with key theme for each one;
i.
National Agrenda: Need to improve the performance of students in
schools to be competitive as a nation (Koretz, 2009 ).
ii.
Changing Role of Principal: The role of the principal in American
schools has changed dramatically from its beginnings of uniformed
education (Rousmaniere, 2007).
iii.
Servant Leadership in Principals lead to More Effective leaders: The
study used the Self-Assessment for Servant Leadership Profile (SALS) to
assess whether or not a leader was a servant leader and the Leadership
Practices Inventory (LPI) to assess principal effectiveness. (Taylor et al.,
2007).
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Principal’s Behavior influence School Culture: The principal’s
influence on school culture has an indirect effect on organizational and
cultural factors of a school (MacNeil et al., 2009).
School Culture influences Student Performance: A strong relationship
exists between school culture and student performance (McCoach et al.,
2004).
Measuring Servant Leadership Behaviors: About 10 validated/tested
Instruments exist to measure Servant Leadership Behaviors some of which
have been used in schools
Measuring Culture: Validated/tested instruments to measure culture exist
and have been used in schools.
Measuring Student Performance: State Test Scores are a standardized
way to measure student performance used across all schools in a state.
d. Summary.
i.
Gap/problem: There is a need to identify different approaches to improve
student performance
ii.
Prior studies: Prior studies show various relationships between tweo of the
three variables (servant leadership behaviors, culture and student
performance) with only one exploring all three
iii.
Quantitative study: Instruments and sources of data exist to collect
numerical data on the three variables
iv.
Significance: research will add to the broad area of correlating leadership,
culture and performance; research may identify specific approaches to be
use by school leadership to improve student performance
3. Problem statement – Describes the phenomena to study (qualitative) or
variables/groups (quantitative) to study, in one sentence: It is not known if there is a
relationship between the level of a principal’s servant leadership behaviors and
characteristics as perceived by teachers in principals and school climate as perceived by
teachers.
4. Sample and location – Identifies sample, needed sample size, and location (study
phenomena with small numbers and variables/groups with large numbers).
a. Location: Alaska
b. Population: All schools in rural Alaska
c. Sample: One district in rural Alaska with approximately 20 principals who each lead a
single school
d. Number of observations for each principal in the sample: There are 5 to 10 teachers in
each school all of whom will be asked to complete the instruments on the principal
5. Research questions – Provides research questions to collect data to answer the
problem statement: R1: What is the relationship between teacher-perceived principal
servant leadership characteristics and teacher-perceived school culture? R2: Are there
relationships between teacher-perceived principal servant leadership characteristics and
student achievement? R3: Are there relationships between teacher-perceived school culture
and student achievement?
6. Hypothesis/variables or Phenomena – Provides hypotheses with variables for each
research question (quantitative) or describes the phenomena to be better understood
(qualitative).
a. H1: There is a significant relationship between a principal’s servant leadership
characteristics as perceived by teachers and measured by the SLAI and teacherperceived secondary school culture as measured by the SCS.
b. H10: There is not a significant relationship between a principal’s servant leadership
characteristics as perceived by teachers and measured by the SLAI and teacherperceived secondary school culture as measured by the SCS.
c. H2A: There is a significant relationship between the principal’s servant leadership
characteristics as perceived by teachers and as measured by SLAI and student
achievement measured by the SIVS.
d. H2A0: There is not a significant relationship between the principal’s servant leadership
characteristics as perceived by teachers and as measured by SLAI and student
achievement measured by the SIVS.
e. H3A: There is a significant relationship between teacher perceived secondary school
culture as measured by the SCS and student achievement as measured by the SIVS.
f. H3A0: There is a significant relationship between teacher perceived secondary school
culture as measured by the SCS and student achievement as measured by the SIVS.
7. Methodology and design – Describes the selected methodology and specific research
design to address problem statement and research questions: This study will use a
Quantitative methodology with a Correlation Design
8. Purpose statement – Provides one sentence statement of purpose including the
problem statement, sample, methodology, and design: The purpose of this quantitative
correlational study was to develop an understanding of the relationships between secondary
school principals teacher-perceived servant leadership, teacher-perceived school culture,
and student achievement in all of the schools in the Lower Kuskokwim School District.
9. Data collection – Describes primary instruments and sources of data to answer
research questions:
a. Independent variable: Level of principal’s servant leadership characteristics /behaviors:
Data will be collected using one of the standard instruments/surveys that measure the
Servant Leadership Style by measuring level of servant leadership characteristics in 610 dimensions currently used for similar studies (Dennis and Bocarnea; 2005)
b. Dependent variable: Level of climate in the school: : Data will be collected using one of
the standard instruments/surveys currently used for similar studies that measure School
Climate by measuring the different dimensions of climate (MacNeil et al., 2009).
c. Dependent Variable: Student performance will be measured by the state/school
standardized test scores (SIVS).
10. Data analysis – Describes the specific data analysis approaches to be used to address
research questions.
a.
Descriptive statistics will be used to summarize the sample descriptive data and the
data on the three variables
b. To test the hypotheses and research questions, inferential statistics were calculated for
the hypothesis (H1, H2A, H3A) tested using simple linear regression analysis.
c. A test for univariate outliers will be conducted to determine if any cases may not
statistically be part of the sample collected.
Example 2: Ten Strategic Points for a Quantitative Causal Comparative Study:
Topic – Provide a board research topic area/title: Impact of teacher collaboration within
Mathematics PLCs on Texas state math assessments
2. Literature review – List primary points for four sections in the Literature Review: a.
Background of the problem/gap; b. Theoretical foundations (models and theories to be
foundation for study); c. Review of literature topics with key theme for each one; d
Summary:
1.
a. Introduction and Background
i. Gap exists in tactics that contribute to improved performance in mathematics state
test scores especially for low SES Hispanic students (NCES, 2010). .
ii. Opportunity to quantity the relationships between collaboration in teachers and
higher state mathematics test scores (DuFour, 2011).
b. Theoretical Foundation
i. Models of collaboration (Naughton, 2006).
ii. Models of high performing schools (Sanders, 2010; Wilson, 2011),
c. Review of Literature topics with key theme:
i. Trends in Education at the National & State Level: Gaps exist in the performance
on state mathematics tests (NCES, 2010)
ii. Characteristics of the Low SES Student Population: Although performance gaps
continue to be higher for some high minority low SES schools (NCES, 2010),
others are high performing or excelling schools on state test results (Jensen, 2009;
Dyson, H. 2008). .
iii. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs): PLCs are being established with
departments to improve collaboration and identify tactics to improve student
performance (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many, 2006).
iv. Teacher Collaboration: Collaboration has been shown to contribute to school and
student success in qualitative but not quantitative studies (Piccardi, 2005; Erkens,
2008; DuFour, 2011).
v. Teacher Collaboration (independent variable) can be measured using a tested and
validated instrument (dependent variable) (Naughton, 2006); Student
Achievement can be measured using mathematics results on state test scores
d. Synthesis/Summary
i. Background: There is Need to Close the Mathematics Achievement Gap
ii. Gap/Problem: Demonstrate relationship between collaboration in PLC and
mathematics achievement in high minority low SES grade schools
iii. PLCs: The Way to Implement Change is through Collaboration through PLCs
iv. Collaboration: Collaboration is a mean to Impact Student Achievement
v. Final Thoughts
3. Problem statement – Explain the phenomena to study (qualitative) or variables/groups
(quantitative) to study, in one sentence: It is unknown what differences exist, if any, in the
levels of perceived teacher collaboration within PLCs in schools identified as high
performing versus those reported at low performing schools, which serve both a high
percentage of low SES students and Hispanic students, on state math assessment.
4. Sample and location – Identify sample, needed sample size, and location (study
phenomena with small numbers and variables/groups with large numbers): Need at
least 30 grade schools that are high performing and 30 that are low performing on state
mathematics test scores with a part of the state of Texas. Schools need to have established
PLCs for mathematics.
5. Research questions – Provide research questions to collect data to answer the problem
statement: R1: What differences exist, if any, between the levels of perceived teacher
collaboration within PLCs in schools identified by the state of Texas as high performing
versus those perceived at low performing schools that serve both, a high percentage of low
SES and Hispanic students, on state math assessment?
6. Hypothesis/variables or Phenomena – Develop Hypotheses with variables for each
research question (quantitative) or describe the phenomena to be better understood
(qualitative)
a. Compare high performing schools on their state test scores in mathematics (group 1) to
low performing schools (group 2) on their perceived level of collaboration in the
mathematics PLCs.
b. HA: There would be a significant difference between the levels of p …
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