paper research writing need help?

  

1- I need the writer to use the University sources that I will give to him. 2- need 5 sources 2 from a book 3 from arterial.3- everything  should be academic.4- use MPA format.5- thesis statement: marriage is better than cohabited because it has more benefit such as financial support, last forever, and been responsible.  if you have better thesis pleas write it.
bbresearchquestions.docx

bbresearchquestions.docx

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
paper research writing need help?
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

annotated_bibliography_template_2.docx

bblevelsofresearch.docx

researchpaperoutlinetemplate.docx

Unformatted Attachment Preview

As you think about possible questions, make sure that they are appropriate lines of inquiry
for a research paper.
Choose questions that are narrow (not too broad), challenging (not too bland), and
grounded (not too speculative).

Choosing a narrow question: if your initial question is too broad, given the length of
the paper you plan to write, look for ways to restrict your focus.
Here, for example, is how two students narrowed their initial questions.
Too broad:
What are the hazards of fad diets?
What are the benefits of stricter auto emissions standards?
Narrower:
Why are low-carbohydrate diets hazardous?
How will stricter auto emissions standards create new, more competitive auto industry jobs?

Your research paper will be more interesting to both you and your audience if you
base it on an intellectually challenging line of inquiry.
Draft questions that provoke thought or engage readers in a debate:
Too Bland:
What is obsessive-compulsive disorder?
How does DNA testing work?
Challenging:
Why is obsessive-compulsive disorder so difficult to treat?
How reliable is DNA testing?
You may need to address a bland question in the course of answering a more challenging
one.
For example, if you were writing about promising treatments for obsessive-compulsive
disorder, you would no doubt answer the question “What is obsessive-compulsive
disorder?” at some point in your paper.
It would be a mistake, however, to use the bland question as the focus for the whole paper.

Choosing a grounded question Finally, you will want to make sure that your research
question is grounded, not too speculative. Although speculative questions — such as
those that address morality or beliefs — are worth asking and may receive some
attention in a research paper, they are inappropriate central questions.
For most college courses, the central argument of a research paper should be grounded in
facts.
Too speculative:
Is it wrong to share pornographic personal photos by cell phone?
Do medical scientists have the right to experiment on animals?
Grounded:
What role should the US government play in regulating mobile content?
How have technology breakthroughs made medical experiments on animals increasingly
unnecessary?
– Rules for Writers, Multimodal Projects (333)
As you think about possible questions, make sure that they are appropriate lines of inquiry
for a research paper.
Choose questions that are narrow (not too broad), challenging (not too bland), and
grounded (not too speculative).

Choosing a narrow question: if your initial question is too broad, given the length of
the paper you plan to write, look for ways to restrict your focus.
Here, for example, is how two students narrowed their initial questions.
Too broad:
What are the hazards of fad diets?
What are the benefits of stricter auto emissions standards?
Narrower:
Why are low-carbohydrate diets hazardous?
How will stricter auto emissions standards create new, more competitive auto industry jobs?

Your research paper will be more interesting to both you and your audience if you
base it on an intellectually challenging line of inquiry.
Draft questions that provoke thought or engage readers in a debate:
Too Bland:
What is obsessive-compulsive disorder?
How does DNA testing work?
Challenging:
Why is obsessive-compulsive disorder so difficult to treat?
How reliable is DNA testing?
You may need to address a bland question in the course of answering a more challenging
one.
For example, if you were writing about promising treatments for obsessive-compulsive
disorder, you would no doubt answer the question “What is obsessive-compulsive
disorder?” at some point in your paper.
It would be a mistake, however, to use the bland question as the focus for the whole paper.

Choosing a grounded question Finally, you will want to make sure that your research
question is grounded, not too speculative. Although speculative questions — such as
those that address morality or beliefs — are worth asking and may receive some
attention in a research paper, they are inappropriate central questions.
For most college courses, the central argument of a research paper should be grounded in
facts.
Too speculative:
Is it wrong to share pornographic personal photos by cell phone?
Do medical scientists have the right to experiment on animals?
Grounded:
What role should the US government play in regulating mobile content?
How have technology breakthroughs made medical experiments on animals increasingly
unnecessary?
– Rules for Writers, Multimodal Projects (333)
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY (a way to save notes for your paper)
(Below are sample entries for books, magazine/journal articles, and Web pages. You probably won’t need every
type of entry for your paper. Find the entry below that best matches the source you used for your paper.
Highlight each section and type in the appropriate information. If you have several sources of the same kind,
copy and paste as necessary. After all your items are entered, rearrange the items so the final version is in
alphabetical order. Don’t forget to save this to your own disk (often!), and be sure you remove gray text such as
this.)
The first examples are for books or chapters in a book:
Last Name, First Name. Title of a Book With One Author, Title Underlined or Italicized, With Significant Words Capitalized. Place of
Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication.
Highlight this passage and replace it with your annotation. In a descriptive annotation, you merely describe what the book, web
page, or article is about. Notice that in this template, the annotation is indented and single spaced. Make sure your instructor is
satisfied with this format before you do the entire assignment.
Last Name, First Name. Title of Book in a Second Edition. 2nd ed. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication.
Highlight this passage and replace it with your annotation. In a descriptive annotation, you merely describe what the book, web
page, or article is about. Notice that in this template, the annotation is indented and single spaced. Make sure your instructor is
satisfied with this format before you do the entire assignment.
The next example is for a magazine, newspaper, or professional journal article:
“Title of Newspaper or Magazine Article With No Author Listed, Title in Quotation Marks.” Title of Magazine or Newspaper,
Underlined or Italicized Day Month Year: page numbers.
Highlight this passage and replace it with your annotation. In a descriptive annotation, you merely describe what the book, web
page, or article is about. In a critical bibliography, you provide a descriptive annotation, and you evaluate the success or
reliability of the book, web page, or article. You might also compare or contrast the source with another source on the topic. Ask
your instructor which kind of annotation you are expected to write. Notice that in this template, the annotation is indented and
single spaced. Make sure your instructor is satisfied with this format before you do the entire assignment.
The next example is for a Web page. Citing Web pages can be tricky, make sure to check with your professor
and/or Purdue OWL.
Author(s) if Given. Name of Web Page. Date of Posting/ Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (if any).
Date You Accessed the Site .
Highlight this passage and replace it with your annotation. In a descriptive annotation, you merely describe what the book,
web page, or article is about. Notice that in this template, the annotation is indented and single spaced. Make sure your
instructor is satisfied with this format before you do the entire assignment.
Levels of Research
In thinking about writing your research question, please read the differences between three
levels of research and try to create your own personal question to reflect the third type.
Level One Research
“Just the Facts”
In these kinds of projects and quests, you are expected to gather basic facts and information
about a state or a city or a country or a battle or a general or a writer or a scientist. Little
thinking is required. This is information gathering at its crudest and simplest level.
Level Two Research
“Other People’s Ideas”
Even though these kinds of projects may engage you in considering important questions such
as the causes of acid rain or overpopulation, it is sufficient for you to gather “conventional
thinking” and the best ideas of others. These are the research projects most likely to inspire
plagiarism as you are tempted to gather other people’s ideas and then pass them off as your
own.
Level Three Research
New Ideas & Synthesis
“In My Humble Opinion” When we require fresh thinking, we stand the least risk of suborning
plagiarism. If you cannot find the answers but must make the answers, you are less apt to
submit others’ ideas as their own. The secret is to pose or ask yourself questions or problems or
decisions which have never been adequately answered.
“How do we restore peace to the Middle East?”
“Why do American movies glorify extreme violence?”
“Which methods of education can combat obesity in the U.S?”
Essential questions are questions worth asking, questions that touch upon basic human issues
or touch matters of the heart and the soul. Often as not, they spawn inquiries that might
extend over a month or a lifetime . . . investigations that might make a difference in the quality
of life . . . studies that might cast light in dark corners, illuminating basic truths.
These essential questions are not immune to plagiarism, since the world’s greatest thinkers
may have “had their turn” at proposing answers, but they can be quite effective as inspiration
for originality
Jamie McKenzie
http://fno.org/may98/cov98may.html
Research Paper Outline Template
I. Introduction
a. Attention Grabber: directly relate the hook to your topic, make the hook catch
the reader’s attention (Can be a surprising statistic, a rhetorical question, an
anecdote or a summary of a fact)
b. Background Information: give a brief history of your topic and explain its
importance. Don’t forget to cite your source here if it’s not common
knowledge.
c. Lead into Thesis: a transition sentence(s) that links the background
information to your thesis
d. Thesis Statement: breaks down an issue or an idea into its component
parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and
evaluation to the audience. States your position on the topic.
II. Body
a. POINT 1
i. Topic Sentence 1
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence + Transition Sentence: connect previous topic
to next topic
ii. Topic Sentence 2
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence + Transition Sentence: connect previous topic
to next topic
b. POINT 2
i. Topic Sentence 1
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence + Transition Sentence: connect previous topic
to next topic
ii. Topic Sentence 2
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence + Transition Sentence: connect previous topic
to next topic
c. COUNTERARGUMENT (if you have one)
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence + Transition Sentence: connect previous topic
to next topic
ii. POINT 3 (Strongest Point)
1. Signal Phrase + Evidence 1: from notes + In-text citation
2. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
3. Signal Phrase + Evidence 2: from notes + In-text citation
4. Explanation: relates evidence to topic sentence/thesis
5. Closing Sentence
III. Conclusion
a. Summarize/Synthesize: a summary sentence(s) that declares a wrap-up of
concepts to begin this paragraph.
b. Restate Thesis: restate the thesis
c. Final Suggestion/Evaluation
IV. Reference page in alphabetical order by last name. See APA/MLA format online.
Remember to cite all of your references in the body of your text following a summary,
paraphrase, borrowed concept (idea) or quote.

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP