Why do we have college, writing homework help

  

3-4 pages/ Ill attach articles the college calculus is the main one to answer is college worth it so look that article up 

**For your final paper, your task is to write an argumentative, editorial-style essay – an opinion piece –
that joins the ongoing conversation about the state of higher education. All year, we have been reading
about and discussing the idea that the college and university system in the United States is experiencing a
crisis, that it has somehow lost its way and is no longer meeting our expectations in terms of its purpose
and its value for students. We have read articles and editorials that address this crisis on a national level,
and we have recently read articles and editorials that address this crisis on a local level, as it relates to
SanFranciscoStateUniversity. We have also viewed a documentary film that examines this crisis at several different kinds of
colleges and universities across the country. At the same time, we have read discussions of higher
education that date to the 1990s and 1970s, which suggests that many of the questions and issues that
underscore this crisis have been circulating for some time.

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To focus your efforts, I will ask that you write your editorial in response to ONE of the two fundamental
topics or questions we have been reading about and discussing this year:

1. Why do we have college? What is its true purpose?

OR

2. Is college worth it? What is its true value?

While these questions are based on those discussed by Joseph Menand and John Cassidy, you may
respond to either one, regardless of which essay you were assigned for Paper #4, the rhetorical analysis.
However, I think your task will be easier if you focus on the topic – purpose or value – that you have
already read, written, and thought about.

**In structure and organization, your editorial should be very similar to Paper #5, the album review. In
your introduction, you will need a HOOK to grab the reader’s attention; you will need to establish the
CONTEXT and CONVERSATION for your topic; and you will need to make a CLAIM (your thesis) in
respect to this conversation: to that end, it will be helpful to provide a brief SUMMARY of the article
most related to your topic.

In the body of your paper, you will need to make two or three of YOUR OWN POINTS, and develop
them in individual paragraphs. For evidence, you may draw from any of the sources listed below in our
bibliography, and you must cite specific passages from the text for support. You will then need to develop
a separate paragraph in which you respond to the NAYSAYERS, those who hold an opinion different
from yours. Here, you may also draw from our bibliography of sources, but you may also need to
brainstorm other possible opposing views.

In your conclusion, you should then make a final RECOMMENDATION or CALL TO ACTION about
your topic. You also need to be clear about why your opinion matters: WHO CARES? SO WHAT?

**Note: as an editorial, this paper is argumentative by design: you should carefully craft a targeted claim
or thesis statement (topic + comment), carefully consider your rhetorical situation (purpose, audience, and
voice), and carefully deploy the basic persuasive appeals (logos, ethos, and pathos). In drafting your
papers, you should also review and draw on the material that we have covered in They Say/Say.

**BIBLIOGRAPHY
In supporting your discussion, you may draw from any of the following sources. To give you a sense of

the kind of essay I am asking you to write, I have highlighted the editorials in bold.

Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, “College too easy for its own good” (2011)

John Cassidy, “College Calculus” (2015)

Sheila Tully, “Why I’ll Strike: a Letter from the CFA Chapter President” (2016)

Mark Edmundson, “On the Uses of a Liberal Education: As lite entertainment for bored college students” (1997)
Colleen Flaherty, “Iconic ethnic studies college at San Francisco State says it can’t pay its bills” (2016)Darcy Fracolli, “Students Will Suffer from Ethnic Studies Financial Woes” (2016)Paolo Freire, Chapter 2, Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970)

Gerald Graff, “Hidden Intellectualism” (2001)
bell hooks, Introduction, Teaching to Transgress (1994)
Lisa Leff, “Deal that averted strike calls for 10.5 percent raises” (2016)
Louis Menand, “Live and Learn” (2011)
Keith Osajima, “Internalized Oppression and the Culture of Silence” (1993)
Adrienne Rich, “Claiming an Education” (1977)
Andrew Rossi, director, Ivory Tower (2014)
Earl Shorris, “On the Uses of a Liberal Education: As a weapon in the hands of the restless poor” (1997)
Jonathan Zimmerman, “Are college students learning?” (2012)
iconic_ethnic_studies_college.pdf

why_i___ll_strike.pdf

students_will_suffer.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

(https://www.insidehighered.com)
Iconic ethnic studies college at San Francisco State says it
can’t pay its bills
Submitted by Colleen Flaherty on March 3, 2016 – 3:00am
Student protests at San Francisco State University in 1968 led to the creation of the College of
Ethnic Studies — the country’s first and only such freestanding college and a pioneer in the field
that has influenced departments nationwide. Now student protesters and faculty members are
fighting to keep the college afloat in light of what they describe as cumulative, effective budget
cuts that have had an outsize impact on their small unit.
“It was a powerful day and testimony to the national and international importance of this college,”
Andrew Jolivette, chair of the college’s Department of American Indian Studies, said of a
massive on-campus rally and meeting last week in support of Ethnic Studies. “This college is
saving lives, as so many of our students are the first in their families to go to college. … But if
we’re this quote, unquote jewel or symbol, why has there been nothing done to advance ethnic
studies before this?”
The protest was prompted by recent word from the university that it can’t keep funding the
college’s consistent deficit of about $200,000 annually, given tight budgets across California
public institutions. But the college says it’s a lot more complicated than that and that the issue is
one of chronic underfunding, not overspending.
“On day one [of the fiscal year] I receive less money than is necessary to pay the salaries of the
people who work here, before I’ve even turned on the copy machine or purchased materials for
classes or offered any faculty members professional development,” said Kenneth Monteiro, dean
of Ethnic Studies. “So when one says that you’ve spent more money than there was before it got
to you, we don’t enjoy that characterization.”
Monteiro and other faculty members say the college’s basic operating budget hovers above $5
million, but since the recession funding it receives from the university doesn’t reflect that. Last
year, for example, Ethnic Studies received an initial budget allocation from Academic Affairs of
$3.6 million, with additional allocation of $1.3 million, and ran a deficit of about $244,000,
according to information from the university. But Monteiro said that those allocations added up to
$275,000 less than was required to pay mandatory salaries. The college is budgeted for 42 fulltime-equivalent faculty, according to information from the university. Of 30,000 students at the
university, 716 were enrolled in at least one College of Ethnic Studies course in fall 2015,
according to information from the university. The college’s numbers are different, at 6,000
students enrolled, with 1,300-1,500 full-time-equivalent students. Monteiro said enrollment’s
stayed flat for the last half-dozen years because the college can’t offer more courses with its
resources.
To run the college based on allocations alone going forward, as is being requested, would mean
cutting all funding to the college’s César E. Chávez Institute for research, community-based
work, work-study for students, core graduate classes, classes taught by faculty members on
sabbatical and more, Monteiro said. It would also mean suspending new hires for several years,
even those to replace faculty members who have retired or gone elsewhere.
Monteiro described such cuts as straitjacketing the college, which he said is growing in terms of
majors and minors and plays an important role in general education for many non-majors. There
were 232 ethnic studies majors in fall 2014, according to the most recent information available
from the university. Monteiro said there’s evidence that students — both white and of color — who
take ethnic studies are more likely to graduate than those who don’t.
Dorothy Randall Tsuruta, chair of the Department of Africana Studies, said she felt backed into a
corner by the situation, and was already concerned about covering classes next year in light of
upcoming faculty departures. Pressure to run a department already on a bare-bones budget
more efficiently doesn’t bode well for academic offerings, she said.
“When you say you can’t afford to offer those classes, then the eventual effect will be that you
don’t have a viable major,” Tsuruta said.
Jolivette estimated the college needed $500,000 to $600,000 more funding annually to remain
viable and serve the needs of its students.
Les Wong, president of San Francisco State, said in an interview that the university is dedicated
to the College of Ethnic Studies, and that it may well be underfunded as a result of recession-era
cuts. So he’s asked the college to work with him, saying that he will foot the $200,000 deficit this
year in exchange for longer-term talks about the future. Previously, Academic Affairs, not the
president, covered the additional expenditure.
“We’ve not asked them to repay that, all we’ve asked them to do is live within their current
budget,” Wong said. “The whole university is stressed.”
Monteiro agreed that the entire campus is strapped for cash, saying that the College of Ethnic
Studies, with its four relatively small departments and one additional program, is probably the
“canary in the coal mine.” That’s why it’s important to have real conversations about its future
and not continue to slap $200,000 “Band-Aids” on it here and there, he said. And those
conversations probably need to include the taxpayers and policy makers who see the value in
increasing funding for public education, he added.
“We live in a state with an almost obscene amount of wealth, but everyone needs to pay their fair
share of taxes to pay the bills of public institutions,” Monteiro said.
San Francisco State isn’t alone in its budget woes. Even the University of California at Berkeley,
the state’s top public institution, recently announced a major academic restructuring [1] to address
systemic financial concerns. Administrators there said they had to act since public funding was
unlikely to increase significantly in the foreseeable future. Ethnic studies on other campuses
have been targeted for cuts (including conversion to programs from departments) since the
recession, such as those at California State University at Long Beach and San Jose State
University. Concerns about the future of ethnic studies in 2014 prompted Timothy White,
chancellor of the California State system, to establish a temporary systemwide moratorium on
significant changes to ethnic studies programs as a task force looked into the issue. The Task
Force for the Advancement of Ethnic Studies is now finalizing its report, according to information
for the chancellor’s office. The moratorium remains in effect. Also within the last several years,
San Francisco and Oakland public high schools have committed to providing ethnic studies
courses for all interested students.
Student protesters gave Wong a set of demands to advance ethnic studies last week, including
that he restore pre-2007 funding to the college and the César E. Chávez Institute and that all
students be required to complete at least one lower- and one upper-division course in ethnic
studies prior to graduation. They asked for more funding for the college’s Student Resource and
Empowerment Center, a full-time grant writer, and the creation of a Center for the Advancement
of Black Life on Campus. Students also want an audit of the Academic Affairs budget and a
public performance review of the provost, Sue Rosser, to understand why Academic Affairs can
no longer cover the college’s deficit.
Wong responded [2] this week by reaffirming his personal commitment to the College of Ethnic
Studies and reiterating “that there will be no reductions of funding for courses or lecturers as we
evaluate the budgetary needs of the college. San Francisco State’s legacy and support of the
first (and only) independent College of Ethnic Studies is a point of pride for all of us.”
He said he’s increasing the allotment to the college by $200,000 this year and is working to
review the students’ other requests, in accordance with university policies and procedures. In
order to increase budget transparency, he said, each college also will be asked to form an
advisory committee made up of students, faculty and staff.
“San Francisco State is still recovering from systemwide budget cuts and consistent
underfunding of the California State University by the state,” he wrote in his letter to protesters.
“However, our five values of equity, community, resilience, courage and life of the mind will see
us through the decisions that will enable the College of Ethnic Studies to continue to thrive and
serve our students for decades to come.”
Diversity [3]
Source URL: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/03/03/iconic-ethnic-studies-college-san-francisco-state-saysit-cant-pay-its-bills?width=775&height=500&iframe=true
Links:
[1] https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/02/11/berkeley-announces-major-strategic-planning-process-addresslong-term-budget-issues
[2] http://president.sfsu.edu/sites/sites7.sfsu.edu.president/files/Presidential%20Response%202-29-16.pdf
[3] https://www.insidehighered.com/news/news-sections/diversity
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APR 2016
ABOUT
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MULTIMEDIA
THE CREATION OF THE COLLEGE OF
ETHNIC STUDIES
19
APR 2016
LIFESTYLE & CULTURE
GATORS LOOK TO MAKE LATESEASON CONFERENCE SPLASH
SPORTS
19
APR 2016





OPINION
FASHION STUDENTS REDESIGN
BOOKSTORE DUDS

19
APR 2016
ANNUAL GREENHOUSE THEATRE
FESTIVAL BRINGS SCRIPTS TO LIFE
OPINION
WHY I’LL STRIKE: A LETTER FROM THE CFA
CHAPTER PRESIDENT
08 MAR
2016
SHEILA TULLY / SPECIAL TO XPRESS

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Twenty-six thousand California State University faculty, including lecturers, counselors, coaches and librarians are poised to strike across
all 23 campuses on April 13th if we do not receive a 5 percent salary increase for year two of our contract. The California Faculty
Association has been negotiating with CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on this issue for two years. White refuses to budge from his
insulting offer of 2 percent – this from a man who is paid more than President Barack Obama.
I do not want to strike – but I will. CSU faculty earn an abysmally low $45,000 per year on average, largely because two-thirds are non​tenured, part-time, temporary lecturers. Faculty have not received a significant general salary increase in nearly a decade. We have
actually lost money over that time, because a promised 11 percent raise in 2006 was cancelled and a 9.3 perecent furlough pay cut was
instituted in 2009. I voted in favor of that furlough – and cutting my own already meager salary – as did the majority of CSU faculty.
This was in the hope that the furlough savings would spare cuts to classes and job lay-offs. During those hard times, faculty sacrificed for
the sake of our students. This year the $5 billion budget for the CSU has been increased by an additional $216 million. Faculty know that
the money is there and that 5 percent is fair and reasonable. We really are not asking for a raise but rather a partial recovery of some of
what we have lost.
It also is important to point out that study after study shows that nationwide, the skyrocketing costs of college education are not the
result of increasing faculty salaries. Instead, across the country, the numbers of university administrators have ballooned as have their
salaries. In the CSU, faculty salaries remained flat over the last decade, while student fees increased by more than 134 percent. Where did
that money go? Certainly not to faculty. However, the salaries of CSU campus presidents increased by 36 percent during that
same period.
On our campus, faculty face the highest cost of living in the country. We have senior faculty, who have dedicated their entire professional
lives to students at SFSU, postponing retirement, fearful that they will not have sufficient income to continue living in the Bay Area.
Younger faculty raising families struggle to pay for escalating childcare and housing costs. Many colleagues have second jobs. Because
salaries are not competitive, we have trouble recruiting and retaining faculty.
This corporatization of the CSU – high salaries for administrators and low wages for everyone else, is not sustainable. Faculty working
conditions are student learning conditions. My decision to strike is not an easy one, but it is necessary in order to pay my bills and
provide my students with the quality education that they deserve. I resent the crocodile tears of management worrying about students
missing five days of classes. I do not recall any such concern during the year of furloughs when students lost 18 days of classes. Budget
decisions are reflections of values. The chancellor needs to re-order his budgetary priorities, pay the 5 percent, and show faculty the
respect that we deserve for our talent, hard work, and commitment to public education.
I ask students to support us in this fight. Talk with your parents, friends, and communities about the strike and the importance of fair
faculty salaries. For more information about the strike, go to www.calfac.org/sfstate and get involved with Students for Quality Education
(SQE) at sfsu.sqe@gmail.com. Faculty, along with staff and students, are the heart and soul of the CSU. Without us, there is no university.
Sheila Tully is the president of the SF State CFA chapter and an anthropology lecturer at SF State
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HARVARD OFFERS SOLIDARITY TO SF STATE THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA
2 Comments
ONE DAY PER YEAR ISN’T ENOUGH TO BRIDGE THE GENDER DIVIDE
1

Golden Gate Xpress
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Chris Goodman

21 days ago
They have gotten raises. The cost of health care has gone through the roof. I don’t think any of them have seen their premiums go up.
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SDSUProf

a month ago
Less than 1/3 of the operating budget goes to faculty. This is a disgrace. The money is there to pay faculty decent salaries, and to hire many more. It is only
misplaced priorities (bloated administration) that prevents this.
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29 comments • 3 days ago

Andrew Jolivette — FYI it isn’t over spending or a “spending problem” the College
Ron Leger — lol… the glee in her eyes as she’s getting off on bullying that skinny
has been under funded and disproportionately cut for the past 10 years by
academic affairs. This is the root cause of the problem along with disinvestment …
little dude kinda tells me her after excuses are a load of bullshit. This isn’t about
race, it’s about a bully getting caught.
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HOME
19
APR 2016
ABOUT
NEWS
MULTIMEDIA
THE CREATION OF THE COLLEGE OF
ETHNIC STUDIES
19
APR 2016
LIFESTYLE & CULTURE
GATORS LOOK TO MAKE LATESEASON CONFERENCE SPLASH
SPORTS
19
APR 2016





OPINION
FASHION STUDENTS REDESIGN
BOOKSTORE DUDS

19
APR 2016
ANNUAL GREENHOUSE THEATRE
FESTIVAL BRINGS SCRIPTS TO LIFE
OPINION / STAFF EDITORIAL
STUDENTS WILL SUFFER FROM ETHNIC
STUDIES FINANCIAL WOES
01 MAR
DARCY FRACOLLI
2016

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SF State has been in turmoil since it was announced last week that the historic College of Ethnic Studies would face budgetary
restrictions in the coming fiscal year.
Students and faculty presented President Leslie E. Wong with a list of demands, marched in protest and held several meetings to develop
a strategy to fight any reduction in spending for the College.
Wong, for his part, said that the administration will not ask the College of Ethnic Studies to cut its spending in the coming fiscal year,
and emailed a statement to students and faculty that he was looking into the viability of their demands. None of this, however, secures
the financial future of the College.
That Ethnic Studies, already the smallest college at SF State, was asked to go on a budgetary diet in a time of serious racial turmoil in
the U.S. is problematic, to say the least.
In a cultural landscape riddled with racial strife and resentment, SF State’s College of Ethnic Studies plays a crucial role in illuminating
the continued fractures that plague the U.S. and helping to heal the racial divide. Because we’ve virtually eliminated specific legal forms
of discrimination, it’s easy for people, particularly white Americans, to write off racism as a thing of the past.
Furthermore, it is important to preserve the cultural narratives that permeate our history. These are stories that are not often told in
standard history classes, but are integral to understanding the foundation of our nation.
A National Bureau of Economic Research study found that students who enrolled in ethnic studies classes had higher attendance rates
and GPAs. These courses benefit students on a personal and societal level. Talking about our cultural and racial differences and the
systemic biases that still exist against people of color is essential to the development of our society.
Last Thursday, officials said that they allocated $3.6 million to the College this year, nearly $2 million less than the Graduate School of
Education received, despite the fact that Ethnic Studies has 30 percent more students.
It is essential that SF State continues to fully support the unique programs and legacy that the College of Ethnic Studies offers to
students going forward.
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GIVING BIRTH IS NOT AS ROMANTIC AS IT SEEMS
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MARINE RESERVE TRANSLATES LEADERSHIP SKILLS TO RUGBY
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Bob

a month ago
“A report released this month by the Center on Education and the Workforce, a research entity affiliated with Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy, has
shown that although more students of color are pursuing a college education, they are highly concentrated in low-paying majors.
“According to the study, which was released Feb. 9, African Americans make up 12 percent of the total population of the United States, but they are
underrepresented in the nation’s fastest-growing, highest-paying jobs, which may be linked back to a student’s choice of major.
“The study reported that African-American students have overwhelmingly chosen majors that traditionally lead to low-paying jobs since 2009, including ma …
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