Expert Answer:For Unit IV of your art gallery presentation, you

  

Solved by verified expert:Art Gallery: Principles of Design For Unit IV of your art gallery presentation, you will be adding descriptions of the principles of design you observe in the artworks you placed in your art gallery. The purpose of this unit assignment is to demonstrate that you can apply what you learned about design principles to your gallery artworks. Begin by reviewing your Unit III feedback and making any necessary revisions to the descriptions of the visual elements.Next, research the design elements in Chapter 4 of your textbook.Place the Design Principles slide directly after the Visual Elements slide describing each artwork.Provide a detailed description of the design principles in each artwork, using full and complete sentences. For design principles, make sure you describe how the artist used most or all of the ones in Chapter 4: unity and variety, balance, emphasis, directional forces, contrast, repetition and rhythm, and scale and proportion. Questions to consider are included below: Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?Variety: What creates diversity?Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?Emphasis: What is the focal point?Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?Repetition and rhythm: Is an element repeated?Scale and proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?ou do not need to cite a source if it is your observation. OnlyYou do not need to cite a source if it is your observation.
Only cite a source if you are using information that someone
published. Be sure to use APA formatting for all outside sources.Please
submit your full presentation thus far, which should include the
previous updated segments and the segment for this unit.This segment must include a minimum of five PowerPoint slides. cite a source if you are using information that someone published. Be sure to use APA formatting for all outside sources.Please submit your full presentation thus far, which should include the previous updated segments and the segment for this unit.This segment must include a minimum of five PowerPoint slides.
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Public Monument and Portrait
Sculptures
03/05/2019
Public Mo nume nt a nd Po rtra it Sc ulpture s
Introduction
I choose Public Sculpture art work of Zenos Frudakis because he is a famous public monuments,
portrait statues, busts, and figurative sculptor.
I will begin with his best known sculpture which has become an internet icon inspiring many in their
quest to break free from boundaries. According to Frudakis, Z. (2019. Zeno’s sculpture freedom has
been listed in Top Ten: Public Art by the Independent.
I have personally see some of his art work like Richie Ashburn Sculpture standing at the citizen’s Bank
Park, Philadelphia PA.
I want to know why monument and portrait sculptures are inspirational to these artist.
I am curious to know why Zenos Frudakis choose Bronze instead of other martial to cast his sculptures
Public Monument and Portrait Sculptures:
Introduction
Zeno Frudakis explore an extensive award-winning collection of more than 100 bronze sculptures in public and
private collections created over three decades (Frudakis, Z. 2019).
“Freedom Sculpture,” “Richie Ashburn Sculpture”, and “Paradigm Sculpture” were dedicated in Pennsylvania
United States. While “Reaching Sculpture” was dedicated in Indianapolis Capital, Indianapolis, Indiana. And
“Knowledge is Power” is in Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey.
Traditionally, sculpture has been made by modeling, casting, caving, constructing, and assembling, or a
combination of the processes (Frank, P. (2014).
Sculptures is one of the medium and artist can utilized to communicate. Sculptures has a unique way to express it
self, unlike other art forms, it patiently waits for you to sit and experience the idea. Its usually in three dimensional
which makes it very appealing, its very silent which makes you speak, enriches viewers ability to comprehend and
elevates the viewers.
Sculpture is a work in three dimensions: it has height, breadth, and depth. It thus exist in space, as we do.
As we look at a sculpture, the total experience of the peace is the sum of its masses, surfaces, and profile.
Freedom Sculpture
Zenos Frudakis
2001
Bronze
Frudakis, Z. (2001)
Freedom sculpture; Visual Elements
Lines- Horizontal and vertical lines have been used in this artwork. They have been used to frame both the sculpture. An immediate view of
this artwork leads one to think of length and width, where length represents vertical lines while width represents horizontal lines. The artists
used both lines to create a frame in which to sculpture human beings. Essentially, the lines lead my eyes to the rectangle sculpture and it
quickly gives me an insight on how the artist was able to develop such creative artwork.
Shapes- The shapes in this artwork are rectangular. From the description of lines, it is clear that the shape used to represent this artwork is
rectangular. The length and width are properly defined in the sculpture, hence giving it a rectangular shape.
Light- the light used in this shape is natural; hence it is coming from a natural source, which is solar. The artwork is sculptured from the
outer part of the wall which is exposed directly to natural light. It highlights the scene where the artwork was developed and it helps one to
discern every part of the artwork with ease.
Color- dark colors have been used in the artwork. The wall is dark, giving the human-like objects a dark color. Alternatively, the color can be
viewed as tints because the objects themselves are black.
Texture-There is a pattern in some parts of the artwork which guided the artists to sculpture a human being. There is a paint texture like
impasto that was used to help the sculpture stand out from the surface of the wall.
Mass-the artwork is heavier on one side to show the posture of the sculpture. However, the mass seems to be properly balanced.
Time – there is an element that gives some sense of time. For instance, the light in this case natural and clearly shows a daytime scene.
Motion- motion is depicted in this sculpture. At the foreground, the stand-alone sculpture leans backward as if dancing. On the wall, one
object leans forward and this shows that there is some motion.
Freedom sculpture
Design Principles:
• Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?
• Variety: What creates diversity?
• Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
• Emphasis: What is the focal point?
• Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?
• Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?
• Repetition & rhythm: Is an element repeated?
• Scale & proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?
Richie Ashburn Sculpture
Zenos Frudakis
2004
Bronze
Frudakis, Z. (2001)
Richie Ashburn Sculpture
Visual Elements
Line-the lines of this artwork are thick. For instance, on the shirt of the sculpture, there is a thick line on the sleeve that
seems to depict how much it was pressed/ironed. Lines describe edges like that of a shirt. They also lead the eyes of
the viewer to some important aspects of the artwork.
Shape-the shape is rectangular based on the frame of the artwork. It highlights the scene in which the sculpture is
positioned.
Light- the light is coming from a natural source, which is solar. It highlights the time of the day.
Color- the color used in this artwork is bright.
Texture- there is no clear pattern on some parts of the artwork but there is a paint texture of impasto.
Mass- the artwork is heavier on the front side because it is in motion-seemingly running.
Time- light gives some element of time. This is a daytime scene.
Motion- motion is depicted. The sculpture is depicted as running.
Freedom sculpture
Design Principles:
• Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?
• Variety: What creates diversity?
• Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
• Emphasis: What is the focal point?
• Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?
• Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?
• Repetition & rhythm: Is an element repeated?
• Scale & proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?
Knowledge is Power
Zenos Frudakis
2014
Bronze
Frudakis, Z. (2001)
Knowledge is Power
Visual Elements
Line- the lines are horizontal and vertical. The lines are delineating the scene and also lead the eyes to the composition
of the scene.
Shape- the shapes here are rectangular shapes in buildings.
Light-it is coming from a natural source considering that it appears to pasted on the wall, which obviously seems to be
exposed to the sunlight. It highlights the time of the day.
Color- the colors used in this artwork are bright. But there is also the use of different shades of one hue.
Texture- there is a pattern on some areas depicting the folding of the clothes worn by the character shown in the
artwork. There use of paint texture like impasto on some areas to depict various parts of the body of the sculpture.
Mass- there is a side that is heavier than the other. For instance, the object featuring the upper part of the body seems
to be heavier on the right side.
Time- the shadows in this artwork give a sense of time, which indeed is a daytime scene.
Motion- there is motion in this artwork. The person in a suit is walking, based on the posture portrayed in the artwork.
Freedom sculpture
Design Principles:
• Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?
• Variety: What creates diversity?
• Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
• Emphasis: What is the focal point?
• Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?
• Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?
• Repetition & rhythm: Is an element repeated?
• Scale & proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?
Reaching Sculpture
Zenos Frudakis
1987
Bronze
Frudakis, Z. (2001)
Reaching Sculpture
Visual elements
Line- This artwork shows horizontal and vertical lines. The artist was able to capture the two sculptured images on the frame. The lines
create space between the objects and also lead the eyes to the scene of interest.
Shape- this shape is rectangular in buildings based on the frame of the artwork. However, the two images that seem to be jumping
towards each other appear to make a circular shape, though it is not definite.
Light- the light is coming from the sun. The visibly present shadows in the artwork indicate that this is actually light from the solar.
Color-these colors are bright and this makes the artwork somewhat shiny. Also, it is not evident that the sculptor used paint texture like
impasto since the images are just in the air and a bit far from the wall.
Mass- the mass is heavier on one side, considering that the characters in this artwork are jumping towards each other. In such a
situation, the mass must be heavier on one side.
Time- Shadows in the artwork highlight time. Thus, the artwork appears to be a daytime scene.
Motion- motion is depicted in the sculpture through jumping. As shown, the characters are in the air trying to reach each other and this
shows there is motion.
Freedom sculpture
Design Principles:
• Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?
• Variety: What creates diversity?
• Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
• Emphasis: What is the focal point?
• Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?
• Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?
• Repetition & rhythm: Is an element repeated?
• Scale & proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?
Paradigm Shift
Zenos Frudakis
2007
Bronze
Frudakis, Z. (2001)
Paradigm Shift
Visual elements
Lines- Also, the lines used in this artwork are horizontal and vertical. They equally lead the eyes to artwork for viewing
and judgment.
Shapes- these are circular shapes in the clouds. The sculpture itself seems is circular to some extent. For instance, the
base of the artwork is circular and also the bottom part of the artwork appears circular.
Light- the light is coming from the sun, though it appears like it is setting. It highlighting the time of the scene.
Color- the colors used to be a bit muted.
Texture – there is not some pattern on the artwork. But the texture of this artwork generally appears fine at face value.
Mass- the artwork is heavier in one area, and in this case on the base. The base is heavier because it supports the
entire artwork.
Time- the sky and the scene highlight the time. However, it is a daytime scene, especially late in the evening during
sunset.
Motion- there is no any sign of motion in this artwork.
Freedom sculpture
Design Principles:
• Unity: what elements work together to make a harmonious whole?
• Variety: What creates diversity?
• Balance: Is it symmetrical or asymmetrical?
• Emphasis: What is the focal point?
• Directional forces: What are the paths for the eye to follow?
• Contrast: Where do you see contrasting elements in the artwork?
• Repetition & rhythm: Is an element repeated?
• Scale & proportion: Are the objects in proportion to each other?
References
Frank, P. (2014). Prebles’ Artforms: An introduction to the visual arts (11th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Zenos Frudakis (2019).Public Monuments and Portrait Sculptures. Retrieved from http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/
Zeno Frudakis. (ca 2001). Freedom Sculpture. Retrieved from http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/freedom-sculpture
Zeno Frudakis. (ca 2014). Knowledge is power. Retrieved from
http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/sculpture/knowledge-is-power/
Zeno Frudakis. (ca 2004). Richie Ashburn. Retrieved from http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/sculpture/richieashburn
Zeno Frudakis. (ca 1987). Reaching Sculpture. Retrieved from http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/sculpture/reachingindianapolis
Zeno Frudakis. (ca 2007). Paradigm Shift. Retrieved from http://www.zenosfrudakis.com/sculpture/paradigm-shift
High Renaissance Art Gallery
Student Name
Columbia Southern University
9/20/2015
High Renaissance Art: Introduction
I chose High Renaissance art because the artwork in this period shows
real distinctive details and emotion.
I want to know why the human body was so inspirational to these artists.
I am interested in learning why this art period is called the “rebirth” of art .
High Renaissance Art: Introduction
• Renaissance Art was done in Europe from the late 1400’s to1600.
• Separated into three main categories: Early Renaissance, High Renaissance,
and Late Renaissance.
• Marked by “logical thought and the new philosophical, literary, and artistic
movement called humanism” (Frank, 2014, p. 279).
• Artists studied anatomy and “applied geometry to the logical construction of
implied space through linear perspective” (Frank, 2014, p. 281).
• High Renaissance was peak of Italian art from 1490 to 1530 (Frank, 2014).
La Primavera
Sandro Botticelli
1482
Tempera on panel
(Botticelli, ca. 1482)
La Primavera
Visual Elements:
• Lines- Vertical curved lines are used to create motion.
• Light- The light is dispersed throughout the artwork, but the figures still look like
they are in shaded woods.
• Color- The light colors stand out against a dark background; light colors are used
for the bodies and the shell.
• Motion- Outstretched arms and legs indicate motion by the figures.
• Shape- Female shapes are elongated to show their beauty.
• Texture – The fabrics, some appear see-through, fruit and leaves on trees, and
scattered flowers on the ground all create patterns and texture throughout the
work.
• Mass – The light shading creates the illusion of the figures taking up space and
mass within the artwork.
• Time – The blue sky, but dark forest make the painting seem like it’s taking place
in early or late day.
La Primavera
Design Principles:
• Balance – The painting is well balanced with figures from left to right.
• Contrast – The light clothing and figures are a sharp contrast with the dark
background.
• Directional forces – Many of the arms appear to be reaching upward,
creating paths for the viewers’ eyes.
• Emphasis – The center figure is the focal point, along with the angel
above her.
• Proportion/scale – The human proportions appear to be elongated
vertically.
• Repetition/rhythm – Figures are repeated and grouped into rhythmic
clusters.
• Unity/variety – The figures create unity, while their stance and motion
create variety.
Mona Lisa
Leonardo da Vinci
1503-1506
Oil on wood
(Da Vinci, ca. 1503)
Mona Lisa
Visual elements:
• Light- Da Vinci uses light on the subject’s face, but uses a hazy light in the
background.
• Lines- There are no lines or edges, because colors and tones are merged
together in the Mona Lisa.
• Colors- Colors are blended without borders in the Mona Lisa. Da Vinci uses dull
yellows and red colors with contrasting cool colors in the background.
• Shape- Rounded shapes form the body and hands in the foreground.
• Mass- The figure in his painting represents the majority of mass.
• Texture- Folds in the clothing create texture.
• Motion – Pathways in the background create movement for the viewer’s eyes.
• Time – Figure’s clothing alludes to Renaissance, but time of day is not specific.
Mona Lisa
Design Principles:
•Balance – Mona Lisa is placed in the center, creating symmetry between the two halves of
her face.
•Contrast – There is low contrast between Mona Lisa and the background, which helps the
figure fit into the space around her.
•Directional forces –There are not strong directional forces, keeping the viewer stuck
mostly looking at Mona Lisa’s eyes.
•Emphasis – Strong emphasis is placed on Mona Lisa’s eyes, since they are looking right
at you.
•Proportion/scale- Mona Lisa is in the foreground making her presence greater in
proportion to the background.
•Repetition/rhythm – Repetition can be found in the folds of Mona Lisa’s clothes. This
creates a visual rhythm along the sleeves of her shirts.
•Unity/variety – Overall low contrast and dull colors create unity across the painting,
and variety is found in the colors used to paint landscape in the background.
The Last Supper
Leonardo da Vinci
1495
Paint on plaster
(Da Vinci, ca. 1495)
The Last Supper
Visual elements:
• Light- Da Vinci uses light on the right side wall, and in the distance to create
space.
• Lines- All lines converge at a vanishing point in the center.
• Colors- White is used for table and walls with blue and orange clothing for the
figures.
• Shape- Doorways, windows, and tabletop are dominating shapes in the artwork.
• Mass- The gathering of figures in the foreground creates mass and movement.
• Texture- Folds in the clothing create texture.
• Motion – The apostles are leaning toward each other as if talking and motioning.
• Time – The setting is just before the death of Christ, and appears to be during the
day.
The Last Supper
Design Principles:
• Balance – Christ’s shape is a symmetrical, perfect triangle in the center of
figures, equal on each side.
• Contrast – There is high contrast in shadows of background and on
figures.
• Directional forces – There is turbulence in the figures surrounding Christ,
but bracketed by figures at ends of table to “hold” in the movement.
• Emphasis – The emphasis is on Christ, and the door way behind his head
creates a halo.
• Proportion/scale – Correct proportions are used for the figures.
• Repetition/rhythm – Doorways and windows in the background create
repetition.
• Unity/variety – The figures create variety, while the symmetrical table and
background unify the scene.
Adam and Eve
Albrecht Dürer
1504
Engraving
(Dürer, 1504)
Adam and Eve
Visual Elements:
• Light- ‘Chiaroscuro’ technique provides tone in this art piece.
• Lines- The use of line work emphasizes the vertical elements.
• Shape- Vertical organic shapes show forms found in nature.
• Mass- Figures in this paintings represent three dimensional mass.
• Texture- Hatching and cross-hatching create the textured surfaces.
• Motion – Figures appear to be reaching toward each other.
• Color – The intaglio process uses black ink, and grayscale is seen
throughout the artwork.
• Time – The image is bright and clear, making it seem like midday.
Adam and Eve
• Unity: Adam and Eve have nearly identical, symmetrical poses. They are visually intertwined with
each other in their positioning.
• Variety: There is quite a bit of variety in size between Adam and Eve and animals. In treatment of
the static poses with the animal’s more animated ones (snake). Variety can be seen in the details.
Also in positioning of animals in foreground and background. Lots of angles…
• Compositional balance: Artwork is balanced with parallel forms of Adam and Eve being
surrounded by trees.
• Emphasis: Adam, Eve and the snake dominate the artwork. Animals are subordinated in the
background. Value contrast helps create the emphasis.
• Directional force: Adam’s gaze at Eve creates a pathways for our eyes. Also, the continuation of
his gaze is created as a line through her hair that curves back into picture plane. This pulls our
focus back to center of image.
• Contrast: The light figures in foreground contrast with the darker shapes of animals and forest in
background.
• Repetition and Rhythm: The shapes created by Adam, Eve, and trees ripple across the
composition.
• Scale: Adam and Eve appear much larger than the animals because the emphasis is on them.
Virgin and Child before an Archway
Albrecht Dürer
1495
Oil on panel
(Dürer, ca. 1495)
Virgin and Child before an Archway
Visual Elements:
• Light- Light appears to be coming from our left toward the figures.
• Color – Dark, warm colors used for the clothing contrast with the figures light,

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